Trimming Your Cat’s Claws

Trimming Your Cat’s Claws

Each cat you adopt from us will arrive with trimmed nails. As a new parent, you should continue this practice throughout the cat’s life. Claws that are not clipped can cause scratches, accidental injury to you or another cat during play and can damage furniture, drapes and walls. Unclipped claws also can grow to encircle the toe pad and it is possible for the claw to pierce through the toe pad causing injury and pain to the cat.

It’s best to attempt nail trimming when the cat is on the sleepy side. If a cat has had a good nap and is ready to play, you are more likely to encounter a lack of cooperation.

How to trim dogs nails.
How to trim cats claws.

Use cat claw clippers to make the task quick and easy. I personally like the  one shown as it provides excellent clipping control.

There are 5 toes with claws on the front foot and 4 on the back foot. The fifth claw on the front foot is called the dew claw. Each claw has a dermis or “quick” that supplies the nail with blood vessels and nerves. On light colored claws the pink colored “quick” is visible. Claws should be trimmed well in front of the quick. If the “quick” is cut it will bleed and make your cat leery of future nail trimming. Holding the paw and exerting a slight pressure on the toe pad will extend the claw, making it easier to clip.

 

 

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